The Future Is Not Set: A Terminator Dossier

A T-800 goes shopping for some clothes at the Griffith Park Observatory, May 12, 1984. Recognize the guy with the spiky blue hair?

I haven’t seen the by-all-accounts underwhelming Terminator: Genisys yet, because since I’ve been busy being a “Critic Fellow” at the one-of-a-kind Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center in the wilds of Connecticut. But I did indulge in some quippy dramaturgy on the wandering-ronin Terminator franchise, for NPR.

Audrey and Bill, reviewed for Washington Post Book World

Audrey Hepburn and William Holden in a promotional image for Billy Wilder's "Sabrina," 1954.I reviewed Audrey and Bill: A Romantic Biography of Audrey Hepburn and William Holden, a crummy book about the two stars’ affair during the making of Sabrina in the early 50s, for The Washington Post. If decades-old Hollywood gossip is your bag, I recommend Karina Longworth’s podcast You Must Remember This. The author of Audrey and Bill, Edward Z. Epstein, is a former publicist; Longworth is film critic and historian. It’s a crucial difference.

UPDATE: Whoops, You Must Remember This already covered Hepburn and Sabrina. 

Two-and-a-Half Stars: 7 Minutes, reviewed.

Luke Mitchell has a mask and a gun, but not a plan, in "7 Minutes."I like Michael Mann and I love Heat in particular, and I love Wes Anderson. But 7 Minutes, a nicely-shot hybrid of Heat and Bottle Rocket, Anderson’s debut, is less than the sum of its influences. I reviewed it for The Dissolve.

The Bitch Is, Regrettably, Back: Jurassic World, reviewed.

jurassic-world-pratt-howard

Stuff I Ran Out of Space to Say in My Just-Posted NPR Review of Jurassic World:

1) Yeah, the sense of wonder that still comes through in Steven Spielberg’s 1993 original comes back, fleetingly, a little, just in the opening act. I think that’s mostly down to Michael Giacchino’s score, which interpolates John Williams’ stately, noble Jurassic Park theme the way John Ottman’s music for Superman Returns interpolated Williams’ march from Superman.

1a)  I haven’t been able to stop humming Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park” in the two days since I saw the new one. Giacchino is the busiest and probably best composer in the blockbuster game these days, as ubiquitous as Williams was 30 or 25 years ago. But I can’t recall any of his original Jurassic World music.

2) This movie, while enjoyable, is even better if you imagine there are subtitles under all the shots of dinosaurs’ faces, like when dog and bear confer in Anchorman.

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A-choo: The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife, reviewed.

Paul Morella, Lise Bruneau, Susan Rome, and Barbara Rappaport (Theater J).My review of Theater J’s updated production of drag-playwright Charles Busch’s 2000 mainstream breakthrough The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife is in today’s Washington City Paper. God bless you.

Waves of Regret: Dawn Patrol, reviewed.

Annex - Flynn, Errol (Dawn Patrol, The)_04I reviewed a movie called Dawn Patrol for The Dissolve. Not the Howard Hawks one from 1930. Or its Errol Flynn-Basil Rathbone-David Niven-starring remake from 1938. This one is a grimy little indie revenge drama that was shot two years ago in Ventura and Oxnard, Calif., the beautiful seaside region where I lived for four-and-a-half years in the very early aughts. It was directed by the writer of Beverly Hills Cop and stars Clint Eastwoodson, better known to the world as Scott Eastwood. Here’s the review.

In the Flesh: Zombie: The American and NSFW, reviewed.

Two satires, each alike in indignation. My reviews of Robert O’Hara’s world premiere Zombie: The American at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company and Lucy Kirkwood’s 2012 NSFW at Round House Theatre are in today’s Washington City Paper, available wherever finer alt-weeklies are given away gratis.