Farewell, Angelina: Tomb Raider, reviewed.


People always told me, don’t go raiding tombs… I mean, if you’re determined to see Tomb Raider, a movie, technically, based on a 2013 reboot of a 1996 video game that previously spawned a couple of Angelina Jolie-starring movies, nothing will deter you. But you’ll be going against critical advice. Continue reading


Nothing to Declare: Gringo, reviewed.

Here’s my NPR review of Gringo, a bloody farce that musters four good comic performances from primarily non-comedic actors in the service of nothing much.

Cloak & Dagger? I Hardly Know ‘Er: Red Sparrow, reviewed.

Red Sparrow, a nasty adaptation of a novel by C.I.A. veteran Jason Matthews starring Jennifer Lawrence and Joel Edgerton, is the Black Widow origin movie Marvel Studios will never make. I like a movie that gets at the existential misery of spycraft. Here’s my NPR review.

John Brown’s Body: The Raid, reviewed.

Copy of CSH_1676As much as like going to Ford’s Theatre to see plays about Abraham Lincoln, going to Anacostia to see plays about Frederick Douglass is a rarer pleasure. Here’s my review of Theatre Alliance’s production of Idris Goodwin’s The Raid, from this week’s Washington City Paper.

What’s Past Is Prologue: The Great Society, reviewed.


I wrote about Arena Stage’s production of Robert Schenkkan’s LBJ play The Great Society in this week’s Washington City Paper.

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Pop Culture Happy Hour: Annihilation! (emphasis mine)

ANNIHILATIONHere is a joke you will not hear on today’s episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour, wherein I join old friends Linda Holmes and Stephen Thompson and new friend Daisy Rosario to dissect (heh) Annihilation, the new thriller from Ex Machina writer/director Alex Garland starring Natalie Portman and involving lots of cool but hella gross body horror stuff:
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Vibranium v Unobtanium: A Slate Investigation

Most of Black Panther is set in the imaginary African nation of Wakanda, a technological utopia whose monarchs have for centuries observed a strict policy of isolationism, keeping would-be colonizers at bay by hiding their nation’s wealth and scientific advancement from the outside world. We’re told in the movie’s very first minute that Wakanda’s prosperity derives from its abundance of Vibranium, and that this bounty was delivered via meteorite long before humans walked the Earth.

And for a resource they’re trying to keep secret, the Wakandans sure talk about it a lot.

Even more than the characters in Avatar (Remember Avatar? Nominated for nine Oscars including Best Picture and Best Director for my boy James Cameron? Still the highest-grossing movie in the history of movies?) speak the much-derided name of that movie’s extraterrestrial miracle metal, Unobtanium.

A lot more.

For this Slate piece, I did the transcription. And the math.

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