Monthly Archives: March 2017

Imperfect Organism: Life, reviewed.

2219634 - LIFELife, the new anti-space-exploration space movie from Swedish director Daniel Espinosa and starring my beloved Rebecca “Ilsa Faust” Ferguson plus some other famous people, is no Gravity. Or Interstellar. Or The Martian. But it’s aight. I reviewed it for NPR, and then, having finished reviewing Life, I recalled The Onion‘s lovely backhanded obituary for Roger Ebert from 2013.

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Sisters of No Mercy: Three Sisters and No Sisters, reviewed.

Caroline Hewitt, Ryan Rilette, William Vaughan, Emilie Krause, Josh Thomas, Craig Wallace, Ro Boddie, and Nick Torres in Three Sisters. Photo- Teresa Wood. Bridget Flanery, Emilie Krause, Ryan Rilette, and Caroline Hewitt (Teresa Wood) .jpg

Studio Theatre is putting on a ballsy experiment for the next month or so, running a new production of Three Sisters and No SistersAaron Posner’s companion play—not in rep but literally on top of one another. I review both in this week’s Washington City Paper.

FURTHER READING: My April 2015 review of Round House’s Uncle Vanya. My January 2015 review of Posner’s Life Sucks, or the Present Ridiculous at Theatre J. My June 2013 review of Stupid Fucking Bird. And my August 2011 review of the Sydney Theatre Company’s Uncle Vanya, starring Cate Blanchett and Hugo Weaving.

Ape-Pocalypse Now: Kong: Skull Island, reviewed.

KONG: SKULL ISLAND

Look, I’m no hero, but did you happen to notice that my NPR review of Kong: Skull Island contains not one occurrence of “titular” or “eponymous”? Please notice that.

Time for Carrousel: Logan, reviewed.

logan-dom-DF-06365r_rgb.jpg

I’m looking forward to the argument we’re going to have over beers, you and I, about whether Logan is the best comic book movie since The Dark Knight or the best Western since No Country for Old Men. 

Here’s my NPR review, where I ran out of space to cite all the things I loved about this movie (Eriq La Salle! Autotrucks!), or to warn you that if you know you will recoil from the sight of an 11-year-old girl defending her life with lethal force, you should skip it. And it would probably be more correct to call it the Rocky Balboa of Rocky movies than the Creed of Rocky movies, but sometimes clarity is more important than pinpoint accuracy.

Bring tissues.