Tag Archives: Capital Fringe Festival

I Haven’t Been on Vacation

With two of my trusted Fringe & Purge Action News and Commentary Squad colleagues, Rachel Manteuffel and Derek Hills. I’m on the right.

A laughable suggestion, HA HA HA! I wouldn’t know a vacation if one punched me in the face and then told me my flight was cancelled!

I spent most of July running the City Paper’s coverage of the seventh Capital Fringe Festival, archived here if you’re curious. I started a Fringe podcast this year, which took more time to produce at an acceptable level of quality than I wanted it to, but that’s how it goes. The episodes I think came out the best are here and here and here and here. Continue reading

Gone Fringe-in’

So I’ve mortgaged my soul away to the Washington City Paper‘s Fringe & Purge blog, all about the Capital Fringe Festival, for another July, just like I did last year. Come see what we’re cooking over there.

But here‘s my Washington Post review of R. Kelly‘s not-nearly-freaky-deaky enough Verizon Center show from Independence Day weekend. I really wish they hadn’t cut the phrase “singing Tourette’s.”

Oh, and here‘s a really flattering, kind of embarrassing thing Andrew Beaujon for TBD wrote to pimp my participation on a panel about John Guare‘s play Six Degrees of Separation at the Phillips Collection last week.

I am very sorry I haven’t called you back or answered your e-mail. September is looking very good for that.

Enda the Road: Studio’s The New Electric Ballroom and Capital Fringe’s Unquiet Mind, review’d

Jennifer Mendenhall, Nancy Robinette and Sybil Lines in "The New Electric Ballroom"

The final entry in Studio Theatre’s Enda Walsh festival, The New Electric Ballroom, is the least rewarding, squandering some lovely performances — and, as always, Walsh’s muddy lyricism — in the service of an opaque story that asks you to accept that a mild romantic disappointment in adolescence would drive not one but two women smeared-lipstick crazy for 40 years. The show is often called a companion piece to the concurrently-running The Walworth Farce, which it preceded by a year, but to me it feels more like an early draft.

My Washington City Paper review is here, along with a complimentary assessment of the Capital Fringe-affiliated Run Through the Unquiet Mind.