Tag Archives: David Ayer

Elf Quest: Bright, reviewed.

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The alarming lesson of Netflix’s new Will Smith-toplined, David Ayer-directed human-&-orc buddy cop thriller Bright is that I am, apparently, not Too Old For This Shit.

Only someone who didn’t see xXx: The Return of Xander Cage or The Fate of the Furious could proclaim this this worst movie of 2017. Let’s be reasonable, now.

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Pop Culture Happy Hour No. 307: Jason Bourne and Suicide Squad

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Beloved Pop Culture Happy Hour host Linda Holmes is at the Television Critics Association gathering in Los Angeles this week, so Tanya Ballard Brown and I joined regular panelists Stephen Thompson and Glen Weldon for an uncharacteristically reserved episode. By which I mean, neither of the big summer movies we autopsied, Jason Bourne and Suicide Squad, is very good, though the latter is much worse. I had hopes for both of them, because I admire their directors, Paul Greengrass and David Ayer, very much, and I’ve tended to like their work. You know what late-summer release was not a big letdown? Star Trek Beyond. I endorse it. Continue reading

Self-Inflicted Wounds: Suicide Squad, reviewed.

I was genuinely curious about Suicide Squad, because I admire many of writer-director David Ayer‘s films, and because I like the sturdy bad-guys-on-a-dangerous-mission premise in general. (I finally saw William Friedkin‘s 1977 thriller Sorcerer a few months ago, and I loved it.) But Suicide Squad is at least as awful as Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, and probably would’ve been lousy even if a panicked studio hadn’t commissioned an edit from a company that specializes in trailers. Anyway, I performed an autopsy for NPR. Continue reading

The Spoils of War: FURY, reviewed.

I expected that David Ayer, the writer of Training Day and the writer-director of End of Watch and Sabotage, would make a gritty World War II combat picture. But I was surprised how much an interest his film takes in the plight of civilian women, and its willingness to show American soldiers behaving badly during the “Good War.” My NPR review is here.

Listen, all y’all, this is (my Village Voice review of) Sabotage.

Arnold Schwarzenegger and Joe Manganiello in David Ayer's "Sabotage."

Both of Sabotage’s prior titles, Ten and Breacher, make more sense than the one it ended up with. Actually, the title is no more nonsensical than the convoluted plot of David Ayer’s gruesome, vulgar, throughly disreputable dirty-cop thriller. It’s only just barely an Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle, which is part of why it’s the most satisfying picture he’s made in 20 years.  I reviewed it for The Village Voice. Continue reading