Tag Archives: Folger Theatre

Love, American Style: Folger’s “The Merry Wives of Windsor,” reviewed.

The cast of Aaron Posner’s ERA-era Merry Wives dances the night away. (Cameron Whitman)

The new bellbottoms-era Merry Wives is your last chance to see Aaron Posner direct some of his (and my) favorite actors—and some welcome new faces—at the scheduled-for-renovation Folger Theater for two years. Would’ve been even groovier sans intermission, but it’s fun. Here’s my Washington City Paper review.

A Moon For the Mediocre: Amadeus, reviewed.

Samuel Adams as “the creature” Wolfgang A. Mozart. (C. Stanley Photography)

To be clear: Antonio Salieri, as self-assessed in the imagination of Peter Shaffer, is mediocre. The Folger’s new production of Amadeus is quite good.

Depth and Deprivation: The Children and Love’s Labor’s Lost, reviewed.

I didn’t write about Ella Hickson’s Oil, the best play I’ve seen this year. But I did review Lucy Kirkwood’s The Children, the second-best. I’m struck by how different two plays with ecological themes written by British women born in the 80s that premiered in 2016 can be. I also wrote about Folger’s new production of the seldom-staged Shakespeare comedy, Love’s Labor’s Lost.

Bitches Be Cray: Saint Joan and The Small Room at the Top of the Stairs, reviewed.

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My reviews of Bedlam’s visiting production of Saint Joan at the Folger and of Spooky Action’s local premiere of Carole Fréchette’s The Small Room at the Top of the Stairs were in last week’s Washington City Paper, but for mysterious reasons took a few extra days to surface online. Enjoy.
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Language Bury Her: Studio’s Translations and Folger’s The Winter’s Tale, reviewed.

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I’ve got reviews of two shows I enjoyed in this week’s Washington City Paper: Studio Theatre second-in-command Matt Torney’s confident new production of Brian Friel’s 40-year-old Irish classic Translations, and Aaron Posner’s The Winter’s Tale over at the Folger. The former as a lot of superb performers who haven’t worked a lot in Washington before. The latter has a bunch of Posner’s favorite actors (and mine), but it’s Michael Tisdale as the maniacal King Leontes who’s the standout.
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Rome If You Want To: Folger’s Antony and Cleopatra, reviewed.

Cody Nickell and Shirine Babb (Teresa Wood)

My Shakespeare professor at James Madison University, Ralph Cohen, told us Antony and Cleopatra was his favorite Shakespeare play. Robert Richmond’s new production for the Folger Theatre, with Cody Nickell and Shirine Babb in the title roles, took me back to my salad days. I reviewed the show in this week’s Washington City Paper. Individual issues are free but the paper is now for sale. It’s all very confusing.

Cody Nickell and Shirine Babb (Teresa Wood)

 

Of Most Rare Note

TWood_Timon_134 Can a working actor get famous in one of Shakespeare’s least-famous plays? In this week’s Washington City Paper, available wherever finer alt-weeklies are given away gratis, I profile the hardworking and versatile titan of stage and stage Mr. Ian Merrill Peakes. He’s currently appearing in the Folger Theatre‘s Timon of Athens, the “Hey Bulldog” of the Shakespearean canon.

What Happens in Orlando Stays in Orlando: As You Like It, reviewed.

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As You Like It is my favorite Shakespearean comedy after Twelfth Night, but when the actor playing Orlando can’t hang with the actor playing Rosalind, it prevents this pleasant diversion from being something deeper. I reviewed the Folger Theatre’s production in this week’s Washington City Paper.

2 Midsummer 2 Dreamz

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I spent a midwinter day and evening taking in two, two, two big productions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, from WSC Avant Bard and the Folger Theatre. I reviewed the experience for this week’s unusually me-heavy Washington City Paper.

The Play’s the Thing, the Thing, and the Other Thing: The Blood Quilt, Jumpers for Goalposts, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, reviewed.

My reviews of — in alphabetical order — the new play The Blood Quilt, the debuting-in-the-U.S. play Jumpers for Goalposts, and the postmodern chestnut Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, are all in this week’s Washington City Paper. Except for the latter two of the three, which are online-only. Find them via the links above.

On Around Town, talking King Hedley II, Mary Stuart, and Cherokee

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 3.29.40 PM On this trio of Around Town discussions, host Robert Aubry Davis, Washington Post arts writer Jane Horwitz and I dissect Arena Stage‘s powerful King Hedley II, Woolly Mammoth‘s meandering Cherokee, and Folger Theatre‘s intriguing Mary Stuart. (My Washington City Paper reviews of are here, here, and here, respectively.) I’m sorry my hair wasn’t as concise and insightful on this day as I strive at all times for it to be. Continue reading

There’re Two Things About Mary: The Widow Lincoln and Mary Stuart, reviewed.

Mary Bacon and Caroline Clay as Mary Todd Lincoln  and Elizabeth Keckley in "The Widow Lincoln" at Ford's Theatre.

My reviews of The Widow Lincoln, a world premiere play from writer James Still at Ford’s Theatre, and of the Folger Theatre‘s new production of Mary Stuart, are in tomorrow’s Washington City Paper, and also right here.

FURTHER READING: My review of Still’s prior Lincoln play for Ford’s, The Heavens Are Hung in Black, from 2009. And my 2010 review of WSC Avant Bard‘s Mary Stuart.

On Around Town, talking Sex with Strangers, Julius Caesar, and How We Got On

For more on how abysmal I am at looking into a camera and smiling when someone says my name, we take you now to the studios of WETA, where I was pleased to join Around Town host Robert Aubry Davis and Washington Post arts writer Jane Horwitz last week for very brief discussions of three shows I recently reviewed for the Washington City Paper, starting with my favorite of 2014, Signature Theatre’s production of Laura Eason‘s Sex with Strangers.

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We Can Do This Like Brutus: Julius Caesar and How We Got On, reviewed.

My reviews of Folger Theatre’s Julius Caesar and Forum Theatre’s production of Idris Goodwin’s How We Got On are in today’s Washington City Paper.

The Life Despotic with Drew Cortese

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I didn’t know Drew Cortese until I saw him in The Motherfucker with the Hat at Studio Theatre this time last year, but the performance made a powerful impression. He’s in Richard III at the Folger Theatre now. We talked about roads not taken and being the bad guy for a piece in today’s Washington City Paper.

All photos by Jeff Malet, courtesy Folger Theatre.

The Motherfucker with the Limp: Folger’s Richard III, reviewed.

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No one was more excited than I was when the Folger Theatre announced that Drew Cortese — a standout player from Studio’s The Motherfucker with the Hat last year — would play Richard III. The show is good, but not the radical reinvention I’d hoped it might be. Read all about it in today’s Washington City Paper on the Internet only.

Wrecks & Effects: Folger’s Twelfth Night and Taffety Punk’s The Golem, reviewed.

Louis Butelli as Feste in Folger's TWELFTH NIGHT. Photo by Scott Suchman.

Louis Butelli as Feste in Folger’s TWELFTH NIGHT. Photo by Scott Suchman.

No, Elvis Costello has not embarked upon a mandolin tour with Steve Nieve. That’s Louis Butelli, whose performance as Feste is one of the highlights of the Folger Theatre’s new production of Twelfth Night, which I review in today’s Washington City Paper along with Taffety Punk’s spooky The Golem. Grab yourself a copy wherever finer alt-weeklies are given away for free.