Tag Archives: horror

Get Up, Get into It, Get Involved: Get Out, reviewed.

la-et-hc-get-out-horror-peele-20161004-snapJordan Peele’s terrific new horror flick Get Out is many things, but it parody it is not. My NPR review is here.

The $59,000 Question: Blair Witch, reviewed.

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In 1999, the nanobudget horror hoaxumentary The Blair Witch Project rode a brilliant marketing campaign to blockbuster-level success. Now there’s a legacy-quel called Blair Witch. My short review is that Blair Witch has displaced previous champ Frances Ha as the longest sub-90-minute movie I’ve seen in the last decade. My longer review, for NPR, is here. Boo. Also, boooooooooooooooo.

I reviewed a movie “that attempts to do for cunnilingus what Jaws did for ocean swimming.”

"Cabin Fever: Patient Zero"

Think of this image the next time you reach for a cigarette. “Cabin Fever: Patient Zero.”

If a giant, irradiated lizard can be the star of a long-running franchise, why not a flesh-eating virus? Many reasons, actually.I still haven’t managed to see Boyhood or Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, but  I reviewed Cabin Fever: Patient Zero for The Dissolve.

The Human Race will make you at least temporarily ashamed to belong to it

Paul Hough's "The Human Race," 2013My review of the low-budget horror movie The Human Race is up on The Dissolve. It’s wretched, but I tried to write a fun piece about it.

Anyway, here’s the 1987 Mick Jagger video I cite as one of this uninspired film’s obvious inspirations.

Young Frankenstein, Getting Older by the Minute

It’s aliiiiiiive!

Well, sort of. In places. For a while.

But not really.

The stage-musical adaptation of Mel Brooks’s beloved 1974 horror film spoof Young Frankenstein will haunt the Kennedy Center Opera House through the holidays, and it’s an utterly explicable choice for this season of multi-generational out-of-town guests: bland and familiar even if you’ve never seen the movie, offering neither challenge nor much reward.

Sporting a brow even lower than that of the stitched-from-corpses creature at its center, and with about as much to say, the show — which began its 14-month Broadway run two years ago — represents Brooks’s attempt to repeat the success of The Producers. As with that 1968 film-cum-2001 Broadway smash, Brooks once again joined new music and lyrics to a story he brought to the screen more than three decades earlier. Continue reading