Tag Archives: John Vreeke

Flying V Fights: The Secret History of the Unknown World, reviewed.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Just because Flying V’s latest fight-choreography-themed show, The Secret History of the Unknown World, is pandering to me even harder than other fight-intensive shows doesn’t mean you won’t enjoy it, too. Read all about it in this week’s Washington City Paper. Also reviewed: Mosaic Theatre Company’s U.S. premiere of Hanna Eady and Edward Mast’s drama The Return.

 

Advertisements

The Meek Shall Inherit the Dearth: Guards at the Taj and You, or Whatever I Can Get, reviewed.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

My reviews of Rajiv Joseph’s marvelous 2015 Guards at the Taj, now at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, and of Flying V’s new musical comedy You, or Whatever I Can Get, are in this week’s Washington City Paper. You are alerted.

Cheks Mix: Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike & Uncle Vanya, reviewed.

We’ve got an An-ton of Chekhov in DC just now, what with Arena Stage doing Christopher Durang’s Tony Award-winning, Chekhov-inflected Sonia and Masha and Vanya and Spike, while Round House Theatre has put together a sublime new Uncle Vanya, working from Pulitzer Prize winner Annie Baker’s recent translation of the play.

I review both of those in today’s Washington City Paper. I have seen Live Art DC’s staged-in-a-bar Drunkle Vanya yet, but it’s stumbling distance from my apartment so I should find the time.

FURTHER READING: My 2010 review of Baker’s Circle Mirror Transformation. My 2011 review of Sydney Theatre Company’s Liv Ullmann-directed, Cate Blanchett and Hugo Weaving-starring Uncle Vanya. My 2012 review of Baker’s The Aliens. My 2013 review of Aaron Posner’s Stupid Fucking Bird, and its follow-up, from earlier, this year, Life Sucks, or the Present Ridiculous. Surely that’s more than enough.

Suicide Admission: Theater J’s The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide, reviewed.

The cast of John Vreeke's production of Tony Kushner's "The Intelligent Homosexual's Guide..." for Theater J.
My review of Theater J’s production of Tony Kusher’s latest play, (deep breath) The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide to Capitalism and Socialism with a Key to the Scriptures, is in today’s Washington City Paper, just in case your own family’s arguments aren’t sufficiently academic and orotund and insufferable enough for you. Good performances, though. Happy Thanksgiving.

This Was Supposed to Be the New World: Theater J’s After the Revolution and Woolly Mammoth’s Detroit, reviewed

Nancy Robinette & Megan Anderson in "After the Revolution." Photo: Stan Barouh/Theater J.

Nancy Robinette & Megan Anderson in “After the Revolution.” Photo: Stan Barouh/Theater J.

I was a bigger fan of Studio Theatre‘s production of Amy Herzog‘s 4,000 Miles earlier this year than I am of Theater J’s new staging of its companion play, After the Revolution.

I can’t fault director Eleanor Holdridge‘s staging of the latter for that; I just connected more strongly to the material in 4,000 Miles. Getting to see two marvelous actors, Tanya Hicken and Nancy Robinette, offer their takes on the same character — a close approximation of Herzog’s grandmother — in 4,000 Miles and Revolution, respectively, within a half-year of each other was fun. Continue reading