Tag Archives: Kennedy Center

Kitchen-Sink Drama: The Gabriels: Election Year in the Life of One Family, reviewed.

Hungry<br /> Public Theatre<br /> LuEster<br /> HUNGRY<br /> Written and Directed by Richard Nelson<br /> Featuring Meg Gibson, Lynn Hawley, Roberta Maxwell, Maryann Plunkett, Jay O. Sanders, and Amy Warren<br /> Sets &amp; Costumes Susan Hilferty<br /> Lighting Jennifer Tipton

Amy Warren, Maryann Plunkett, Lynn Hawley, and Meg Gibson in “Hungry” at the Public Theater, March 2016.

Notice is posted: My review of playwright/director Richard Nelson’s three-play cycle The Gabriels, which I took in during a single nine-hour period at the Kennedy Center last Sunday, is in this week’s Washington City Paper.

Continue reading

Advertisements

I’m Told “Little Person” Is the Respectful Way to Refer . . .

Kris Medina and Maude Mitchell

. . . to people who display the physical characteristics common to all the male actors who appear in Mabou Mines DollHouse, which is at the Kennedy Center for a brief run this weekend. I wrote it up for the Washington City Paper.

OKnowGOwritethereviewthankyou

I’ve written about OK Go, a band I like, on two prior occasions. The first time, I even incurred a big, fat ugly correction for four errors in the piece, only one of which was present in my copy as filed. (I’ve forgiven and forgotten, obviously!) Plus a lot of randomly italicized letters. But this piece I wrote in the Kennedy Center’s press closet in half an hour on a bottle of water and a cookie. With a headache.
Continue reading

He Is Marshall: Laurence Fishburne does Thurgood Justice

You could be forgiven for being a little wary of Thurgood, George Stevens, Jr.’s one-man stage biography of the Hon. Thurgood Marshall, as performed by Laurence Fishburne. What’re the odds a grade school-to-grave account of the life of the first African American to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court, boasting a star of such Zen-like solemnity that you totally believed him about us all being pickled, hairless pod-dwellers plugged unawares inside The Matrix, could be anything more than plodding hagiography? Great for high school history and government classes, but nothing made with such worthy intentions could possibly be any fun. Right?

Sez you. Point one, Fishburne, reprising his role from a Broadway run two summers ago, is as impish and avuncular as he is authoritative. Whether lurching across the stage with on a cane or channeling LBJ’s puffed-up, Lone Star imperiousness, he’s a captivating presence for every second of this 95-minute monologue. Point two, the story of Marshall’s life — one Stevens seems to have taken a strict-constructionist, if anecdotal, approach to interpreting — is simply a hell of a story, so rich in incident and character (and names — his Uncle Fearless gets a lot of play here) and humor and triumph that it seems too good to be true. Continue reading

Double Shot of DRUID

DRUID’s kiss-me-quick production of two Synge plays, The Shadow of the Glen and The Playboy of the Western World, reviewed for DCist.

Bow Down Before The Lion King!

No, it’s good. Really. Are you at all surprised? I wasn’t. Which is why my review is less than a rave, even though the choreography and especially the sets and costumes are all topnotch.