Tag Archives: MetroStage

On Around Town, talking Uprising and Bad Dog and Alice in Wonderland

Anthony Manough and Cynthia D. Barker in MetroStage's "Uprising." (Chris Banks)

Our long summer hiatus complete, I’m back on WETA’s Around Town with host Robert Aubry Davis and fellow theatregoer Jane Horwitz to talk about three recent shows I reviewed for the Washington City Paper: MetroStage’s historical musical Uprising, Olney Theatre Center’s brutal-but-funny addiction drama Bad Dog, and Synetic Theatre’s confused new version of Alice in Wonderland. You will no doubt notice from my lapels that I am wearing a new sport jacket, at my mom’s insistence. Continue reading

After the Raid: Uprising, reviewed.

Anthony Manough and Cynthia D. Barker in MetroStage's

Reviewed in this week’s Washington City Paper: Gabrielle Fulton’s Uprising, about Osborne Perry Anderson, who wrote the only first-hand account of the doomed 1859 raid on Harper’s Ferry led by abolitionist John Brown. In this “rolling world premiere” at Alexandria, Virginia’s MetroStage, a mix of Negro spirituals and original songs power Fulton’s story of a romance between Anderson — a fugitive for his role in Brown’s raid — and a Pennsylvania field hand named Sal.

Some wonky characterization aside, I found it to be a powerful and not-glib exploration of heroism and sacrifice. My review is here.

Waiting for Goodman, the Comedian‘s Son

When he was writing Rooms: A Rock Romance, the two-person musical that premiered at Alexandria’s MetroStage in 2008 before going on to a warmly-reviewed off-Broadway run last year, Paul Scott Goodman inserted a layer of remove from direct autobiography: He based the show’s female character, rather than her male paramour, on himself.

When he returns to MetroStage this weekend, he’ll have no such veil.

Son of a Stand-Up Comedian is the story of a moment in the life of Paul Scott Goodman as written and performed on 12-string guitar by Paul Scott Goodman, 22 or 52 years in the making, depending. The composer/lyricist began working on his solo musical — which he performs in front of a microphone, concert-style, “a rock-and-roll raconteur kind of thing” — in the middle of 1988, when his wife, director Miriam Gordon, was pregnant with Shayna, their first child. Now 21, Shayna is set to graduate from Sarah Lawrence College next month.

“That summer was one of the hottest on record in New York,” Goodman says in the Scottish brogue he’s retained since moving to Manhattan in 1984. “I was working on my first musical, trying to get it on. I was trying to be a father, trying to be a writer, trying to be a husband. It was very trying.” Continue reading

Making Sweet Musical

Natascia Diaz and Doug Kreeger in Rooms: A Rock Romance. Photo by Colin Hovde.

Ever wonder how an original musical gets written? A: Very slowly.

And now I’m writing about theatre for the Paper of Record.