Tag Archives: Shannon Dorsey

When They Stop Looking at Us: Fairview, reviewed.

Chinna Palmer in the Woolly production of Fairview. (Teresa Castracane)

When I saw Woolly Mammoth Theater Company’s production of Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present... in 2014, it was the worst show I’d ever seen. Five-and-a-half years later, it still is. So to say that I liked Woolly’s new production of Fairview, Drury’s Pulitzer Prize-winner that made its debut last year, better than her previous work is of little value. But I liked it a lot. I appreciated it, more like.

I do understand that my approval is not required. It never is. My Washington City Paper review is here.

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Wake Up: Studio’s Skeleton Crew and Theatre Alliance’s Word Becomes Flesh, reviewed.

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You’ve got two, two, two big shows written by and starring people of color up in the District just now: Skeleton Crew, the third entry in Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit series, has the same concerns as Lynne Nottage’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Sweat but it’s a better play, and Studio Theatre’s production is built to last. And Psalmayene 24’s multi Helen Hayes Award-winning production of Marc Bamuthi Joseph’s Word Becomes Flesh is back at Theatre Alliance for a remount starring the same superb cast it did last year. I review both in this week’s Washington City Paper. For which I also wrote the cover story, for some reason. It’s not like I get paid by the word, people.

Epic-in-the-Brechtian-Sense Fail: Kiss, reviewed.

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Feeling compelled to write a play about war or genocide? You’ve got your work cut out for you, but God bless. Feel compelled to turn your frustration over how hard it is to write a good play about war or genocide into a play? Please stop. A lot of things are about you, but not everything.

Woolly Mammoth’s American premiere of Chilean playwright Guillermo Calderón’s Kiss is not as bad as Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present, because nothing I’ve ever seen on a stage is as myopic and offensive as Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present. But it ain’t good. I break it down in today’s Washington City Paper, available wherever finer alt-weeklies are given away gratis.