Tag Archives: Signature Theatre

Unsinkable? Unthinkable! Signature Theatre’s all-singing, all-dancing Titanic, reviewed.

id3a0868Signature Theatre has revived Titanic, a multi-Tony Award-winning musical from 1997 that almost no one remembers. Apparently it was upstaged by some movie? My Washington City Paper review is here.

All that (Inventor of) Jazz: Jelly’s Last Jam and The Lonesome West, reviewed.

My reviews of Signature Theatre’s new production of George C. Wolfe and Susan Brikenhead’s early-90s Jelly Roll Morton bio-musical Jelly’s Last Jam, and Keegan Theatre’s production of Martin McDonagh’s late-90s black comedy The Lonesome West, are in today’s Washington City Paper.  Notice is served.

Gay for Play: La Cage Aux Folles, reviewed.

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My review of Signature Theatre’s robust revival of Jerry Herman and Harvey Fierstein’s beloved Reagan-era musical farce La Cage Aux Folles is in this week’s Washington City Paper. I like the show, but I don’t like my review as much as the one I wrote of the Goodspeed Opera House’s production about a year ago, as part of my coursework for the Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center’s National Critics Institute. Which is odd, because I remember thinking I was producing mostly unpublishable copy while I was there. I’ve never been a fast writer. Most days we had copy due at 8:30 or 9 a.m. about the show we’d seen the night before. Anyway, the Critic Class of 2016 starts their two-week term on Saturday. Good luck, you guys. I envy you, sort of — just not your early-a.m. deadlines or your accommodations or your on-campus meals.

Actually, the coffee was pretty decent. I drank a lot of it, at any rate.

Losin’ It: All the Way and The Mystery of Love and Sex, reviewed.

Jack Willis as President Lyndon Baines Johnson and Bowman Wright as Martin Luther King, Jr. (Stan Barouh)

Prince is all I’ve thought about in the can-it-really-be-only-a-day since the world learned of his death, but here are the two theatre reviews I filed earlier in the week for the Washington City Paper. Arena Stage does Richard Schenkkan’s 2014 Tony winner All the Way, and Signature Theatre stages Bathsheba Doran’s The Mystery of Love and Sex.

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Popcorn Psychology: Signature’s The Flick, reviewed.

Thaddeus McCants, Laura C. Harris, and Evan Casey in Signature Theatre's "The Flick."

I review Signature Theatre’s production of the Pulitzer Prize-winning comic drama The Flick in this week’s Washington City Paper. It’s the fourth Annie Baker play I’ve reviewed — five if you count her translation of Uncle Vanya — and the second in which I’ve quoted a heckler. Maybe I wouldn’t have done that had I remembered doing it in my review of Studio Theatre’s The Aliens three-and-a-half years ago.

Further reading, if you really want to see me struggle not to repeat myself: Circle Mirror Transformation, from 2010, and Body Awareness, from 2012.

When You’re a Jet Something Something: West Side Story, reviewed.

west-side-story2-1780x1254I brought my folks to Signature Theatre’s reverent, rapturous production of the Broadway classic West Side Story the week before Christmas, but due to vagaries related to two issues falling on holidays between then and now, my Washington City Paper review is only now surfacing. I filed on time, dammit. At least I think I did. Who can remember anything from before Christmas now? Holiday-time usually brings a conventional but deeply satisfying revival of a proven crowd favorite, and this winter, West Side Story is the one to beat.

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Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps): Girlstar and Avenue Q, reviewed.

In this week’s Washington City Paper, I size up a pair of musicals: Signature Theatre’s Girlstar is a confused mess borne aloft by a strong cast, and Constellation Theatre’s revival of the hit Sesame Street parody Avenue Q is funnier and more soulful than The Muppets. (The dour 2015 version, not The Muppet Show.) More words, if not necessarily more insight, on these subjects here and here.