Tag Archives: The Rolling Stones

Dad Rock of Ages: Twilight of the Gods, reviewed in The Washington Post

rolling-stones-bild-04-2009-CMS-SourceMy first Washington Post byline in two years in a review of Steven Hyden’s new book Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock. I had it with me on my own journey to the end of classic rock, when I caught an Amtrak up to New York two months ago to see Springsteen on Broadway. (I wrote up my impressions for Slate.) Strangely enough, my prior Post item was a review of Hyden’s previous book, Your Favorite Band Is Killing Me. That book was good. This one is better. Maybe your mom would enjoy receiving a copy on Sunday. I don’t know. I don’t know your mom.

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WaPo Book Review: Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll

David Bowie in Nic Roeg's "The Man Who Fell to Earth."

In tomorrow’s Washington Post – the part of it that’s already out today, in fact I review Peter Bebergal’s Season of the Witch, a book that actually manages to make the intersection of rock and roll and the Occult seem boring. The Bowie photo is from Nic Roeg’s creepy movie The Man Who Fell to Earth, wherein the Thin White Duke plays an alien visiting Earth from a drought-stricken planet.

But other than the skull cap and the contact lenses, that’s what he really looked like in 1975 when a 19-year-old Cameron Crowe interviewed him. His raging abuse of cocaine during this period had made him paranoid, and specifically convinced that witches were trying to steal his semen to create a homunculus. According to Bebergal. I regret that I couldn’t find space to mention this in my 500-word review. (I don’t remember anything about that in the Bowie biography I wrote about in the Dallas Morning News a few years back, but my memory is worse than useless.) Continue reading

Please Allow Me to Introduce Myself: Synetic’s The Master and Margarita, reviewed

Photo: Graeme Shaw / courtesy Synetic


Haven’t seen that new Harry Pottery movie yet, but I wrote about this for the City Paper.

Live Last Night: James Hunter and Ryan Shaw

james-hunter-autograph

Reviewed last night at the Birchmere; showed up on Post Rock and in Thursday’s Paper of Record.   My all-new, all-earlier deadline makes we write things like this:

“If melisma is The Force and Mariah Carey is Darth Vader, then Shaw would be Obi-Wan Kenobi, a steady, beneficent presence who uses his potentially destructive powers for good.”