Tag Archives: The Welders

The Hateful Eighth: An Octoroon and To Tell My Story: A Hamlet Fanfic, reviewed.

The Octoroon, Woolly Mammoth Theatre Co.

My review of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company remount of An Octoroon, the best show I saw in 2016, is here. I should’ve credited Gwydion Suilebhan (a Woolly staffer, though I’ve known him longer than he’s been on payroll there) for the observation in paragraph four about police body cameras; I couldn’t swear I would’ve thought of that if he hadn’t mentioned it to me when we were chatting after the show. He’s a playwright and a very smart guy, so if you’re going to pilfer ideas, he’s a good victim.

I also reviewed To Tell My Story: A Hamlet Fanfic, the latest literary comedy from Washington Post humor columnist Alexandra Petri.

FURTHER READING: My 2013 profile of An Octoroon playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins.

Fight Call: On the Welders’ new MMA play The Girl in the Red Corner

Audrey Bertaux and Jennifer J. Hopkins grapple in rehearsal for "The Girl in the Red Corner." (Darrow Montgomery)

Today’s Washington City Paper has a feature from me about a new play from the DC theatre collective The Welders set in the milieu of mixed martial arts. It’s by Stephen Spotswood, a prolific dramatist whose work I have followed with interest for the last five years or so, and it’s the first play about a bloodsport here in DC since Studio Theatre did Sucker Punch in early 2012. (I did a feature on that one, too.) You can use the link above, or pick up a dead-tree copy wherever finer alt-weeklies are given away for free.

Audrey Bertaux and Jennifer J. Hopkins grapple in rehearsal for The Girl in the Red Corner. (Photo: Darrow Montgomery)

Unconvention Centers: The Welders’ Transmission and Solas Nua’s Wild Sky, reviewed.

Megan Graves and Dylan Morrison Myers in "Wild Sky" (Solas Nua)

In today’s Washington City Paper, I review two new plays being staged in unusual environments. The Welders’ Transmission, by playwright/performer Gwydion Suilebhan, is a thoughtful meditation on the hazards of storytelling, while Deirdre Kinahan’s Wild Sky is a human-scale look back at a pivotal moment in Ireland’s struggle for self-governance. It’s also the first show from Solas Nua in five years. I’m glad they’re back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tête-à-Tête Offensive: Tender Napalm and The Carolina Layaway Grail, reviewed.

Laura C. Harris and Elan Zafir in Signature Theatre's "Tender Napalm" (Teresa Wood)

In one of the the shows at Signature Theatre right now, a woman (named “Woman”) tells a man (“Man”) in precise, step-by-step detail how she plans to sever his penis and scrotum.

In the theater next door, Beaches: The Musical is playing. Six of one…

I review Philip Ridley’s Tender Napalm in this week’s Washington City Paper. Plus Allyson Currin’s The Carolina Layaway Grail, the inaugural production from DC playwriting collective The Welders.

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